Teni Features On Vogue Magazine

What may look like an unbelievable but true story is that our very own Teni Makanaki has been featured on Vogue Magazine.

Talented plus size musician Teniola Apata was honored by popular international magazine, Vogue Magazine.
Now the part where this sounds unbelievable, is the fact that she is not a model nor one of those Nigeria international act.

A picture from her just released video “Sugar Mummy” was posted on Vogue Magazine official Instagram page, with a lovely caption.

They wrote;

There’s an assumption that women have to look a certain way to be feminine, but I don’t want to conform to that stereotype,” @tenientertainer says. “My thing is this: You don’t get to decide how I choose to live my life. I’m being me, respect that.” In a scene largely dominated by braggadocious men, @tenientertainer presents a refreshing counterpoint. Where other afrobeats stars are infusing their sound with international flavors—Caribbean soca or Southern trap, for example—the singer is among a burgeoning new wave of artists mining Nigeria’s rich musical past. “Fargin,” the breakout hit that put Apata on the map (she was signed after the Instagram video of her singing it went viral), draws on the spirited melodies of ’70s and ’80s fuji and juju legends, such as King Sunny Ade, Ebenezar Obey, and King Wasiu Ayinde. And yet there is a decidedly pointed message simpering beneath the song’s lilting harmonies. Switching between Yoruba and Pidgin and English, Apata calls out lecherous “uncles” who prey on young women, exposing hypermasculine posturing with incisive wit. Tap the link in our bio to read more. Photographed by @bailikedubai

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“There’s an assumption that women have to look a certain way to be feminine, but I don’t want to conform to that stereotype,” @tenientertainer says. “My thing is this: You don’t get to decide how I choose to live my life. I’m being me, respect that.” In a scene largely dominated by braggadocious men, @tenientertainer presents a refreshing counterpoint. Where other afrobeats stars are infusing their sound with international flavors—Caribbean soca or Southern trap, for example—the singer is among a burgeoning new wave of artists mining Nigeria’s rich musical past. “Fargin,” the breakout hit that put Apata on the map (she was signed after the Instagram video of her singing it went viral), draws on the spirited melodies of ’70s and ’80s fuji and juju legends, such as King Sunny Ade, Ebenezar Obey, and King Wasiu Ayinde. And yet there is a decidedly pointed message simpering beneath the song’s lilting harmonies. Switching between Yoruba and Pidgin and English, Apata calls out lecherous “uncles” who prey on young women, exposing hypermasculine posturing with incisive wit. Tap the link in our bio to read more. Photographed by @bailikedubai

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